Second Floor
Hours
  • TEMPORARILY CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE DUE TO COVID-19
  • M-F: 8am - 5pm
865-215-8824, eths@eastTNhistory.org
First Floor
Hours
  • TEMPORARILY CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE DUE TO COVID-19
  • M-F: 9am - 4pm
  • Sat: 10am - 4pm
  • Sun: 1pm - 5pm
  • Closed April 12
865-215-8830
Third Floor
Hours
  • TEMPORARILY CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE DUE TO COVID-19
  • M-Tu: 9am - 8:30 pm
  • W-F: 9am - 5:30 pm
  • Sat: 9am - 5pm
  • Sun: 1pm - 5pm
  • Closed April 10
  • Closed April 12
865-215-8801
Second Floor
Hours
  • TEMPORARILY CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE DUE TO COVID-19
  • M-F: 8am-4:30pm
  • Closed April 10
865-215-8800

Ijams Nature Center (TN) Images of America

Paul James

Ijams Nature Center, on the banks of the Tennessee River, evolved from humble beginnings during the early 20th century into a natural showplace known as the Island Home Bird Sanctuary. Developed by Harry Ijams, Knoxville’s leading ornithologist, and Alice Yoe Ijams, “First Lady of Knoxville Garden Clubs,” the Ijams property has been a gathering point for birders and nature-lovers for more than a century. Girl Scouting has been a fixture at Ijams since 1923, followed by Camp Mary Ijams, and Camp Margaret Townsend in the Smokies was created in part through Ijams and Townsend family ties. Harry Ijams also helped establish the first official campsite on Mount LeConte and used his artistry as a commercial illustrator to promote the Smoky Mountains as a national park. Over the years, Ijams Nature Center has grown in size and stature to become the region’s leading wildlife sanctuary and environmental learning center incorporating Mead’s Quarry, which in its heyday produced Tennessee marble used both in local buildings and national monuments. 127 pages.

$21.99
Weight: 
1 lb
Dimensions: 
9 × 1 × 6 in