Second Floor
Hours
  • TEMPORARILY CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE DUE TO COVID-19
  • M-F: 8am - 5pm
865-215-8824, eths@eastTNhistory.org
First Floor
Hours
  • TEMPORARILY CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE DUE TO COVID-19
  • M-F: 9am - 4pm
  • Sat: 10am - 4pm
  • Sun: 1pm - 5pm
  • Closed April 12
865-215-8830
Third Floor
Hours
  • TEMPORARILY CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE DUE TO COVID-19
  • M-Tu: 9am - 8:30 pm
  • W-F: 9am - 5:30 pm
  • Sat: 9am - 5pm
  • Sun: 1pm - 5pm
  • Closed April 10
  • Closed April 12
865-215-8801
Second Floor
Hours
  • TEMPORARILY CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE DUE TO COVID-19
  • M-F: 8am-4:30pm
  • Closed April 10
865-215-8800

Knoxville Images of America

Ed Hooper

Though it began as a small fort on the Tennessee River, Knoxville would not know obscurity for long. Founded in 1791, Knoxville became the capital of the new state of Tennessee five years later and rapidly became a major metropolitan area for the southeastern United States. Exportations of raw and natural goods brought wealth and new residents, and soon its main thoroughfare became a window into the growth, development, decline, and rebirth of an all-American city. Then, as now, all roads downtown lead to Gay Street, and everything Knoxville came from it. Though Knoxville is a decidedly Southern city, it has also taken its place within the American melting pot. Swiss, English, Dutch, Irish, German, Greek, African, and Spanish families have all played major roles in the city's development. For many years, at one small popcorn stand on Gay Street stood Gary Crowder-the meticulous owner of the amazing collection of photographs predominantly featured in Images of America: Knoxville.

$21.99
Weight: 
1 lb
Dimensions: 
9 × 1 × 6 in