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Delve into the rich heritage of East Tennessee pottery with the East Tennessee Historical Society’s latest release, Tennessee Turned: Earthenware and Stoneware Made in East Tennessee, 1800-1900. Authored by renowned pottery authority Carole Carpenter Wahler (1937-2023), this captivating book documents the pottery displayed in the Museum of East Tennessee History’s 1996 exhibition Made in East Tennessee: Pottery. Through exhaustive comparative study of these works, Wahler provides groundbreaking attributions to makers, revises dates of production, and applies a consistent vocabulary for describing the details that East Tennessee potters wrought into their wares.

Notable highlights from the 240-page Tennessee Turned include:

  • An introduction by J. Roderick Moore, Director Emeritus of the Blue Ridge Institute and Museum, Ferrum College, Virginia
  • An essay by Wahler on East Tennessee pottery making, collecting, and documentation
  • Detailed black-and-white images of 206 pots, presented by county of production, plus 26 color plates
  • Comprehensive “Notes” and “Glossary” sections in which Wahler applies new terminology to describe East Tennessee pottery

“The heart of this publication is the ‘Notes’ section,” says Adam H. Alfrey, Assistant Director for Historical Services, Knox County Public Library, who served as editor and designer for the publication. “We are the beneficiaries of Carole’s countless hours of looking at and comparing these pots. She crafted a new vocabulary and wrote meticulous descriptions that breathe life and vibrancy into these wonderful ties to the past.”

Whether you are a seasoned collector, a decorative arts scholar, a history enthusiast, or simply captivated by the beauty of handmade crafts, Tennessee Turned promises to enlighten. A cursory turning of its pages allows for the evolution of forms, glazes, and firing methods that define East Tennessee pottery between 1800-1900 to become immediately evident.

Available in the East Tennessee Historical Society’s Museum Shop and online starting April 1, 2024. The catalog retails for $40.00 (US) plus $12.00 shipping. Members of the East Tennessee Historical Society receive a 10% discount. Wholesale pricing and reduced pricing for museums, libraries, and other educational institutions are available by contacting 865-215-8824 or [email protected]. Proceeds from the sale of Tennessee Turned support continued research in areas connected to Carole C. Wahler’s interests.

Do not miss your chance to own a first edition of Tennessee Turned, a piece of East Tennessee’s storied past!

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23rd Annual East Tennessee History Day showcases student performances, exhibits, documentaries, papers, and websites for a chance at state and national competition.

News

A Memorial to Dr. Bob Booker

All of us at the East Tennessee Historical Society were very saddened to learn of the passing of Bob Booker on the 22nd of February.

News

Unveiling of MIA, a new accessibility feature for the visually impaired at the Museum of East Tennessee History

The East Tennessee History Center is launching a new accessibility program that aids individuals with visual impairments in touring the Museum of East Tennessee History and navigating the various floors of the History Center.

On February 29, 167 students representing 12 schools throughout East Tennessee gathered at the University of Tennessee Student Union in Knoxville to compete at East Tennessee History Day, a regional competition of National History Day. Throughout the year, middle and high school students researched topics surrounding the 2023-2024 Turning Points in History theme, then presented their research at this competition in one of five categories – exhibits, performances, papers, documentaries, and websites.

First and second place winners, with third place winners serving as alternates, will advance to the state National History Day competition, Tennessee History Day, sponsored by the Tennessee Historical Society, on April 20, 2024. From there, state winners will advance to nationals in College Park, Maryland, in June 2024. Regional contest co-sponsors the East Tennessee Historical Society (ETHS) and the University of Tennessee’s Department of History congratulate and commend these students and their teachers on their hard work and success.

“Students engaged with and impressed judges at the East Tennessee History Day regional contest as they do each year,” said Lisa Oakley, ETHS Vice President and Curator of Education. “The National History Day 2024 theme, Turning Points in History, inspired impressive projects, many of which will advance on to the state contest in April.”

About the National History Day Competition

National History Day (NHD) grew out of a history fair that originated in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1974 and quickly expanded to numerous states, with the first national competition held in 1980 in Washington, D.C. Each year, roughly one million students participate in the NHD program. National History Day competitions engage middle and high school students in discovering the historical, cultural, and social experiences of the past through conducting extensive research, interpreting information, and drawing conclusions. For more information, visit nhd.org.

View all photos taken during the East Tennessee History Day competition at https://ericmanneschmidt.smugmug.com/East-TN-Historical-Society/National-History-Day/NHD-2024/n-s5VZzb

Junior Awards

Junior Individual Website

First Place
Rocket 88: A Turning Point in Music History
Alex Bradley
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

Second Place
Naval Aviation: The Turning Point that Changed the U.S. Navy Forever
Reagan Rousayne
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

Third Place
The Creation of Fender
Nick Disney
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

 

Junior Group Website

First Place
The Demand Regulator: Scuba’s Most Influential Turning Point
Bryan Spannaus and Tristan Walker
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

Second Place
Tsar Bomba, The Day the Earth Moved: A Weapon that Changed History
Ryan Bacon and Cole Vanderlinde
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

Third Place
The First Successful Kidney Transplant: Its Impact on Medicine and the World
Nonavea Rodgers and Lillian “Lilly” Blanton
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

 

Junior Individual Exhibit

First Place
Air Jordan: The Dawn of Athlete Branding
Ethan Gray
Clayton-Bradley Academy, Teacher: Stephen Otis

Second Place
Beyond the Rainbow: Technicolor in Cinematic History
Colette O’Dell
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

Third Place
Chernobyl: A Turning Point in History
Ava Stooksbury
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

 

Junior Group Exhibit

First Place
Pedaling the Path to Equality
Tori Goff, Nadya Alborz, Claire Bollschweiler
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

Second Place
Kate Warne: Detective in Disguise
Lydia Simmons and Ella Brewer
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

Third Place
The Salem Witch Trials: Mass Hysteria
Vivian Le, Kyra Kirkland, Miller Hutchinson, Stella Prudente
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

 

Junior Individual Paper

First Place
DNA Analysis: A Turning Point in Criminology
Allison Lamar
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

Second Place
The Battle of Stalingrad: The Turning Point in World War II
Sebastian Perkey
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

Third Place
The History of Pinyin: The Turning Point in the Chinese Language
Judd Graves
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

 

Junior Individual Performance

First Place
Empowering Generations: Patsy Mink—A Trailblazer in Women’s History
Anadi Patel
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

Second Place
The Effect of the Bombing of Pearl Harbor Through the Eyes of the Citizens of Pearl Harbor
Bella Stanford
Cedar Bluff Middle School; Teacher: Maureen Schenk

 

Junior Group Performance

First Place
The First National Bank and its Predecessors
Lyla Navo and Piper Williams
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

Second Place
First Women Voters in New Zealand
Alexa Mekelburg, Katelyn Rousayne, Miela Towle, Finley Sigler, Hannah Jones
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

Third Place
The Tennis Career of Chris Evert 
Evelina Bostick and Emma Andresen
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

 

Junior Individual Documentary

First Place
From Mines to Mainstream: Levi’s, a Symbol of Change
Anjali Devarakonda
Farragut Middle School; Teacher: Krystal Darrow

Second Place
Tanner School: A Symbol of Changing Opportunity in East Tennessee
Cayton Griffin
Cosby Elementary; Teacher: April Griffin

Third Place
Tinker Vs. Des Moines: The Turning Point Behind Student Voices
Doaa Soliman
Farragut Middle School; Teacher: Krystal Darrow

 

Junior Group Documentary

First Place
Judi Chamberlin and the March for Justice: Turning Points in History
Georgina Jones and Alexandra Margetis
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

Second Place
The Manhattan Project: How a Secret City Changed the World
Dylan Basowski, Rameen Alborz, Connor Patterson
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

Third Place
9-11: The Day that Changed the World
Kiri Fellenbaum and Saylor Heim
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Stephen Otis

Senior Awards

Senior Individual Website

First Place
Kitty Genovese and the Creation of 911
Teagan McKenna
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Andrew Fultz

Second Place
How the Black Death Inspired Society
Stella DeLuca
West High School; Teacher: Erin Grigsby

Third Place
The Cuban Missile Crisis
Thomas Place
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Andrew Fultz

 

Senior Group Website

First Place
Women’s Suffrage in East Tennessee
Leigha Woody and Laney Owens
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Andrew Fultz

Second Place
The Revival of the Pigeon River
Alexis McCarter and Brooke Freeman
Cosby High School; Teacher: April Griffin

Third Place
Apollo 11: The Landing that Changed America
Christian Rymer and Addison Woods
Cosby High School; Teacher: April Griffin

 

Senior Individual Exhibit

First Place
The Body Farm: A Turning Point in Forensic Anthropology
Isabella Malone
Sevier County Junior High School; Teacher: Rebecca Byrd

Second Place
Turning the Trajectory: The Johnson-Reed Immigration Act of 1924
Molly Bohanan
Sevier County High School; Teacher: Rebecca Byrd

Third Place
Florence Nightingale
Claire Holt
Cosby High School; Teacher: April Griffin

 

Senior Group Exhibit

First Place
Imagining Literacy: Dolly Parton’s Effect on Childhood Literacy
Sam Hutapea, Kyle Harper, Katie Harper, Lizzie Borrego
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Karen Stanish

Second Place
Upwelling and Darwin’s Coral Reef Theory
Yugi Wang and Margaret Spencer
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Andrew Fultz

Third Place
Stalingrad
Will Sharbel and JP Peace
West High School; Teacher: Erin Grigsby

 

Senior Individual Paper

First Place
Perry Wallace and the SEC
Niko Christian
West High School; Teacher: Erin Grigsby

Second Place
German Nationalism Before and After the Treaty of Versailles
Gloria Habiyaremye
L&N Stem Academy, Teacher: Andrew Fultz

Third Place
Half a Century of Fear: How One Nuclear Test Changed America
Colton Pruitt
West High School, Teacher: Stephen Longo

 

Senior Individual Performance

First Place
The Cherokee Syllabary: A Turning Point in Native American Education, Geo-Political Communication, and Intra-Tribal Gender Relations
Zee Carnes
Disco Institute; Teacher: Elithe Carnes

Second Place
The Fanatic Fujiwara Follower
Jameson Neubauer
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Andrew Fultz

 

Senior Group Performance

First Place
The Articles of Confederation
Sadie Jones, Ani Larsen, Farida Fathalla, and Melanie Milliken
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Karen Stanish

 

Senior Individual Documentary

First Place
A Daunting Effort: How War Was Turned in the Pacific
Ethan Benson
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Karen Stanish

Second Place
The Titanic: NHD Documentary
Eathon Phillips
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Andrew Fultz

Third Place
Exploring the Milgram Experiment
Gwendolyn Henry
West High School; Teacher: Stephen Longo

 

Senior Group Documentary

First Place
The First Insulin Shot: A Turning Point in History
Ansiley Wright and Cadie Wilson
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Karen Stanish

Second Place
Donald Triplett: A Turning Point in American History
Quinn Livingston and Addison Preston
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Andrew Fultz

Third Place
Rhymes and Repercussions: How the War on Drugs Impacted the Birth of Hip-Hop
Gabriel Ensminger and Diondre Jackson
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Andrew Fultz

Special Awards

Sequoyah Award (Sponsored by Indian Creek Productions, Inc.)

Senior Individual Performance
The Cherokee Syllabary: A Turning Point in Native American Education, Geo-Political Communication, and Intra-Tribal Gender Relations
Zee Carnes
Disco Institute; Teacher: Elithe Carnes

 

East Tennessee History Award (Sponsored by the Boyd Foundation)

Junior Individual Documentary
Tanner School: A Symbol of Changing Opportunity in East Tennessee
Cayton Griffin
Cosby Elementary; Teacher: April Griffin

 

Dan and Mary Shannon Award for Use of Primary Sources
(Sponsored by Judy Buscetta)

Junior Division

First Place
Junior Individual Documentary
Tinker Vs. Des Moines: The Turning Point Behind Student Voices
Doaa Soliman
Farragut Middle School; Teacher: Krystal Darrow

2nd Place
Junior Group Exhibit

Pedaling the Path to Equality
Tori Goff, Nadya Alborz, Claire Bollschweiler
Clayton-Bradley Academy; Teacher: Nicole Whitecotton

Senior Division

First Place
Senior Group Exhibit
Imagining Literacy: Dolly Parton’s Effect on Childhood Literacy
Sam Hutapea, Kyle Harper, Katie Harper, Lizzie Borrego
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Karen Stanish

Second Place
Senior Individual Documentary
A Daunting Effort: How War Was Turned in the Pacific
Ethan Benson
L&N STEM Academy; Teacher: Karen Stanish

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ETHS publishes Tennessee Turned: Earthenware and Stoneware made in East Tennessee, 1800-1900

A catalog based on the Museum of East Tennessee History’s 1996 exhibition Made in East Tennessee: Pottery

News

A Memorial to Dr. Bob Booker

All of us at the East Tennessee Historical Society were very saddened to learn of the passing of Bob Booker on the 22nd of February.

News

Unveiling of MIA, a new accessibility feature for the visually impaired at the Museum of East Tennessee History

The East Tennessee History Center is launching a new accessibility program that aids individuals with visual impairments in touring the Museum of East Tennessee History and navigating the various floors of the History Center.

Dr. Booker was a powerful voice for change and a leader during the Civil Rights movement in Knoxville.  As a student at Knoxville College, he was president of the student body when he was jailed protesting Jim Crow rules in Knoxville. He also led the sit-in movement to integrate lunch counters and played a pivotal role in the integration of the historic Tennessee Theatre in 1963. Later, he became Knoxville’s first Black Tennessee state representative.

Dr. Booker was also a historian, authoring countless articles for the News Sentinel and was an author who published five books which explore Black history in Knoxville and the role of the Civil Rights movement in East Tennessee. His work on the perils of urban renewal in Knoxville and its legacy are essential. As Angela Dennis has said, ‘His passion for history was contagious as he tirelessly worked to ensure that the narratives of the Black experience were never forgotten.” In fact, Dr. Booker’s work marks him as one of Tennessee’s most important historians.  For me, he sits alongside great historians such as W.E.B. Du Bois, who pioneered the concept of Black History and other major figures like Mary Frances Berry and Roger Wilkins. His books like Two Hundred Years of Black Culture in Knoxville, Tennessee 1791-1991, and Heat of a Red Summer are necessary reading for anyone studying Black history of the South and certainly for those studying it in Tennessee. Even his local histories like From the Bottom up and The 120 Year History of Knoxville College are central narratives for the study of Black history and culture from Knoxville College to urban renewal and how it affected Knoxville and blighted a generation of its Black citizens.

He remains a profound influence on my own thinking as a historian and as a person. He was always happy to lend a hand on a project and was so generous in sharing his knowledge.  We often discussed music as we both hosted radio shows. We often talked about jazz musicians like Duke Ellington and Count Basie.  He loved music and singing karaoke and would tell me the best karaoke bars to visit when I first moved back to Knoxville. We are all slightly reduced now in his absence, but his legacy lives on in his histories which will continue to inform, educate, and inspire new generations.

Photos taken from Dr. Bob Booker’s book, “From the Bottom Up.”

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ETHS publishes Tennessee Turned: Earthenware and Stoneware made in East Tennessee, 1800-1900

A catalog based on the Museum of East Tennessee History’s 1996 exhibition Made in East Tennessee: Pottery

News

23rd Annual East Tennessee History Day showcases student performances, exhibits, documentaries, papers, and websites for a chance at state and national competition.

News

Unveiling of MIA, a new accessibility feature for the visually impaired at the Museum of East Tennessee History

The East Tennessee History Center is launching a new accessibility program that aids individuals with visual impairments in touring the Museum of East Tennessee History and navigating the various floors of the History Center.

The impetus for this new project was Girl Scout Mia Warren, who brought her Gold Award project to East Tennessee Historical Society and Knox County Public Library team members to develop a comprehensive gallery tour for visually impaired guests using interpretive text and written descriptions of key objects. Mia was inspired to pursue this as her Gold Award project after visiting museums with her friend Campbell Rutherford, who is visually impaired. “It would be nice not to rely completely on someone else, so if I wanted to stay back and finish looking at an exhibit, while someone else went on ahead, I could have that freedom,” remarked Campbell.

Approximately 20 million Americans (or 8%of the US population) have some degree of visual impairment. Museums across the country offer varying degrees of access for visually impaired guests, from Braille handouts to audio tours.

Campbell recommended an innovative method that allows visually impaired visitors to utilize screen readers on their personal devices. Instead of being asked to carry an audio stick, download a separate application, or use other unfamiliar technology, the MIA system allows guests to scan QR codes placed strategically throughout the History Center. These codes open webpages that contain a comprehensive written description of the space. Specially optimized for screen readers, the guest’s device then reads the description to the guest, providing them cues on how to safely navigate the space and in-depth descriptions of what is displayed in that space. The webpages may also be used by guests with restricted eyesight, who may choose to adjust the font size and contrast of the text, or by deaf-blind guests, who may access the same content via a portable Braille reader.

“It’s all about thinking of others,” said Mia. “We can help a lot of people who just want to get the full experience out of a museum.”

The East Tennessee History Center is grateful to Mia and Campbell for helping move this new accessibility initiative from discussion to action. The History Center is also indebted to Mia for the countless hours she expended in organizing the museum’s interpretive text, measuring distances between displays, and writing descriptions of objects.

MIA: Museums Increasing Accessibility is a project of the Museum of East Tennessee History and is an on-going initiative to increase accessibility in the museum for all.

About the MIA Project

Mia Warren is a Girl Scout in Troop 20496 from Knoxville, Tennessee, who was awarded a Gold Award, the organization’s highest honor, on December21, 2023, for the project MIA: Museums Increasing Accessibility. Girl Scouts pursuing a Gold Award are asked to propose and implement a lasting solution to a societal problem in their community. Mia chose museum accessibility, thinking of her family friend Campbell Rutherford of Dandridge, Tennessee, who was born with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a rare type of inherited eye disorder. When the two visited museums together, they quickly learned that there were significant challenges for Campbell to have a meaningful visit. “There’s no spotting a museum and saying, ‘Oh! I might step in there for a bit,’” said Campbell. “You usually have to call ahead and see what the options are, to maybe schedule someone to walk through with you in advance. It’s more of an ordeal than it should be.”

Mia partnered with the Museum of East Tennessee History, where for the past two years she has researched best practices in museum accessibility and tested solutions for improving the museum-going experience with Campbell and other members of the visually impaired community. With assistance from team members from the East Tennessee Historical Society and Knox County Public Library, Mia created a QR code-based system that not only best served her target audience but also was able to be integrated into existing exhibitions. This system of QR codes provides access to a comprehensive written description of the museum, which allows individuals with visual impairments to navigate the entire museum independently using their own screen reader technology. Mia authored the comprehensive written description of the museum, which includes measurements between locations, all of the museum’s interpretive text, descriptions of objects on display, and other important cues.

“I didn’t realize how much I saw,” reflected Mia on her experience describing the Museum in text. “There’s a lot of hazards that you wouldn’t normally notice. On the cabin, there’s a shelf that a white cane wouldn’t be able to hit; I would have never thought about, because I can see it.” That detail, which assist visually impaired guests to safely move about the space, is now included in the MIA system.

The East Tennessee History Center is committed to increasing access for all. MIA: Museums Increasing Accessibility, which was named in honor of Mia’s hard work, is the first step in a series of planned initiatives to ensure that all guests have an equal opportunity to experience and appreciate the history of East Tennessee. For example, while Mia’s project initially focused on the museum, the MIA system has been installed throughout the East Tennessee History Center, so that visually impaired visitors to the Calvin M. McClung Historical Collection and Knox County Archives can independently navigate those spaces. Museum team members also hope to share the MIA system with other cultural institutions in hopes it becomes an industry standardized platform for accessibility. “Ideally, I would hope other museums would see this and realize that it’s not that complicated to make something accessible, “said Mia. “Then make it just like a normal thing, like you make a new exhibit and you just do this with it.”

MIA is sponsored by

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ETHS publishes Tennessee Turned: Earthenware and Stoneware made in East Tennessee, 1800-1900

A catalog based on the Museum of East Tennessee History’s 1996 exhibition Made in East Tennessee: Pottery

News

23rd Annual East Tennessee History Day showcases student performances, exhibits, documentaries, papers, and websites for a chance at state and national competition.

News

A Memorial to Dr. Bob Booker

All of us at the East Tennessee Historical Society were very saddened to learn of the passing of Bob Booker on the 22nd of February.

From the Collection

New to the Collection in 2023

Throughout the year, ETHS acquires objects and artifacts that help continue to tell stories of the people of East Tennessee. These objects come by way of gifts, purchases, or transfers. In 2023, ETHS saw 142 “new” objects added to the permanent collection, bringing the total to 16,420 Thank you to generous individuals who gifted items or donated to the Artifact Acquisition Fund.

Book Notes

What Did Southerners Have to Say about the Vietnam War?

Book Note: Joseph A. Fry, ed., Letters from the Southern Home Front: The American South Responds to the Vietnam War (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2023).

Book Notes

Honoring East Tennessee’s Veterans

The East Tennessee Veterans Memorial: A Pictorial History of the Names on the Wall, Their Lives, Their Service, and Their Sacrifice by John Romeiser with Jack H. McCall. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2020. Hardcover, $45.00)

The SHARP grant funded staff for assistance on weekends and has been instrumental in providing the support for us to establish a clear idea of what the organizations needs are to meet the needs of visitors in our newly opened family gallery.  It would have been very difficult to take this step without this support.

Humanities Tennessee is the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

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ETHS publishes Tennessee Turned: Earthenware and Stoneware made in East Tennessee, 1800-1900

A catalog based on the Museum of East Tennessee History’s 1996 exhibition Made in East Tennessee: Pottery

News

23rd Annual East Tennessee History Day showcases student performances, exhibits, documentaries, papers, and websites for a chance at state and national competition.

News

A Memorial to Dr. Bob Booker

All of us at the East Tennessee Historical Society were very saddened to learn of the passing of Bob Booker on the 22nd of February.

Jenny and Randy Boyd Named East Tennesseans of the Year

Honorary co-chairs for the event were Bill and Crissy Haslam. Randy Boyd is President of the University of Tennessee System and the founder of Radio Systems Corporation, Boyd Sports, and TnAchieves. Jenny Boyd owns Boyd’s Jig & Reel, is a member of the Old City Association, and serves on the boards of the Tennessee Arts Commission, Great Smoky Mountains Heritage Center, and the Museum of Appalachia. Together the Boyds have given more than $10 million to more than 100 charitable causes, from entrepreneurship and education, to child and animal welfare, to mental health and the arts.

The East Tennessee Historical Society Board of Directors established the award in 2011 to recognize and honor an East Tennessee history maker. Honorees must be an ambassador for our region and represent integrity, dignity, leadership, and the volunteer spirit. The award is given to East Tennesseans with either a recent accomplishment or a compilation of accomplishments in fields such as history, politics, entertainment, education, business, research, or humanitarian work that improves the lives of others. Previous award winners are Bill Haslam, Jack Hanna, Roy Kramer, Pete DeBusk, Natalie Haslam, Phillip Fulmer, and Lamar Alexander.

Randy & Jenny Boyd, East Tennesseans of Year 2022

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ETHS publishes Tennessee Turned: Earthenware and Stoneware made in East Tennessee, 1800-1900

A catalog based on the Museum of East Tennessee History’s 1996 exhibition Made in East Tennessee: Pottery

News

23rd Annual East Tennessee History Day showcases student performances, exhibits, documentaries, papers, and websites for a chance at state and national competition.

News

A Memorial to Dr. Bob Booker

All of us at the East Tennessee Historical Society were very saddened to learn of the passing of Bob Booker on the 22nd of February.

The ETHS has been awarded a $50,000 Arts and Culture Alliance American Rescue Plan (ARP) Renewal Grant. The Arts and Cultural Alliance manages this grant program on behalf of Knox County and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Funds support ETHS’s education department in its efforts to combat the impact of lost instructional time for Knox County K-12 school children using evidence-based programs and services.

ETHS is especially proud of the work we do with Knox County teachers and students, especially those who qualify for Title 1 funds. Through support such as this grant and other sponsors past and present, we can provide free educational programming to schools who face student income challenges. Not only are we able to provide equitable programming to students in Knox County, but also throughout the region. It is our goal to provide valuable education experiences to all students, regardless of economic status.

To extend the reach of ETHS into classrooms, ETHS Education Program Manager Dani Manley is working to expand the existing education volunteer corps and to provide further training that will ensure a consistent educational experience from our volunteer staff. Additionally, she is working to develop virtual alternatives to some of our most popular programs. These offerings will increase the range of the ETHS education department and let us more regularly serve the East Tennessee region more extensively. For schools with limited internet access, we will of course still travel to the schools to provide engaging, object-based experiences. The Arts and Culture Alliance American Rescue Plan will ensure Dani can continue to develop and broaden ETHS student programming over the next year.

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ETHS publishes Tennessee Turned: Earthenware and Stoneware made in East Tennessee, 1800-1900

A catalog based on the Museum of East Tennessee History’s 1996 exhibition Made in East Tennessee: Pottery

News

23rd Annual East Tennessee History Day showcases student performances, exhibits, documentaries, papers, and websites for a chance at state and national competition.

News

A Memorial to Dr. Bob Booker

All of us at the East Tennessee Historical Society were very saddened to learn of the passing of Bob Booker on the 22nd of February.

Retired Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Gary Wade will join Haslam for this special “Tennessee Conversation” event, to be held in the sanctuary at First Presbyterian Church in downtown Knoxville.

The publisher, Thomas Nelson, notes that “Haslam has long been at the center of politics and policy on local, state, and federal levels, and he has consistently been guided by his faith, which influenced his actions on a wide range of issues. Yet the place of faith in public life has been hotly debated since our nation’s founding, and the relationship of church and state remains contentious to this day.”

He continues that “Faithful Presence: The Promise and the Peril of Faith in the Public Square calls for a different way. Drawing upon his years of public service, Haslam will discuss his remarkable vision for the redemptive role of faith in politics while examining some of the most complex issues of our time.”

About the Speakers

Bill Haslam is the former two-term mayor of Knoxville and former two-term governor of Tennessee, reelected in 2014 with the largest victory margin of any gubernatorial election in Tennessee history. During his tenure, Tennessee became the fastest improving state in the country in K-12 education and the first state to provide free community college or technical school for all its citizens, in addition to adding 475,000 new jobs. Haslam serves on the boards of Teach for America and Young Life. In the fall of 2019, Haslam became a visiting professor of political science at Vanderbilt University. He and his wife of 38 years, Crissy, have three children and nine grandchildren.

Gary Wade worked as a private practice attorney in his hometown of Sevierville, Tennessee, where he was elected mayor in 1977 and served five successive terms. He then became a judge for the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals for 19 years and was its presiding judge for eight of those years. Former Governor Phil Bredesen appointed Wade to the Tennessee Supreme Court in 2006, where he also served as the court’s chief justice for two years. Wade retired from the Tennessee Supreme Court in 2015, then serving as vice president and dean of Lincoln Memorial University’s Duncan School of Law until he retired in 2020. He now holds a position at Knoxville law firm London Amburn.

Books Are Available

Books will be available for purchase and signing following the event. If you would like to buy books beforehand, hardback copies are available from the Museum of East Tennessee History’s gift shop. You may pre-order your copy prior to attending the event, and we will have it ready for pick up upon your arrival. We will also ship signed or unsigned books. To order, call 865-215-8830 or 865-215-8825.

Publisher: Thomas Nelson (May 25, 2021)
Hardback: 240 pages
Dimensions: 6.2 X 0.95 X 9.3 inches
Item Weight: 13.9 ozs.

Info needed for shipping: Name, preferred shipping address, billing address, and complete information on method of payment (Please note if you would like a signed or unsigned copy.)

Info needed for day-of sales: Name, billing address, and complete information on method of payment

Purchase price per book: $26.99
Sales Tax: $2.50
Total per book for pick up: $29.49
Shipping Cost: $5.00
Total per book shipped: $34.49
Shipping cost per additional book: $2.00

Members receive a 10% discount! Please let us know you are a valued ETHS member when calling.

More News

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News

ETHS publishes Tennessee Turned: Earthenware and Stoneware made in East Tennessee, 1800-1900

A catalog based on the Museum of East Tennessee History’s 1996 exhibition Made in East Tennessee: Pottery

News

23rd Annual East Tennessee History Day showcases student performances, exhibits, documentaries, papers, and websites for a chance at state and national competition.

News

A Memorial to Dr. Bob Booker

All of us at the East Tennessee Historical Society were very saddened to learn of the passing of Bob Booker on the 22nd of February.